The
Romans

The Romans, similar to the Greeks, discovered tragedy and produced various plays, many of which shared similarities with their Greek counterparts.

Roman

The Romans discovered tragedy similar to how the Greeks did, and became equally interested in it as well. Due to the Romans, the ideas of theatre spread rapidly and reached places as far as England. The year 240 BCE is when scholars believe that the Roman drama really became popular. None of the early Roman tragedies written survive today.

The Romans share many similarities with the Greeks, and many of the playwrights took similar themes and plots from their Greek counterparts.

Influential Members



seneca

Seneca

Seneca the Younger, fully Lucius Annaeus Seneca and also known simply as Seneca, was a Roman Stoic philosopher, statesman, dramatist, and—in one work—humorist of the Silver Age of Latin literature.

livius

Livius

Lucius Livius Andronicus was a Greco-Roman dramatist and epic poet of the Old Latin period. He began as an educator in the service of a noble family at Rome by translating Greek works into Latin, including Homer's Odyssey.

gnaeus

Gnaeus Naevius

Gnaeus Naevius was a Roman epic poet and dramatist of the Old Latin period. He had a notable literary career at Rome until his satiric comments delivered in comedy angered the Metelli family, one of whom was consul.

Notable Works



Phaedra

Seneca

Octavia

Seneca